• James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/prairies opener 2.jpg

    Visit our expansive restored prairies and step back a couple centuries or so. You'll have to imagine the Conestoga wagons, though!


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/prairie opener3.jpg

    Visit our expansive restored prairies and step back a couple centuries or so. You'll have to imagine the Conestoga wagons, though!


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/arb July 4016.jpg

    Our prairie plots seen from a distance in early summer seem a dull green and look like an overgrown lawn, rising only about knee deep. However, visit them in August through frost time and you'll find a riot of color extending well over your head.
    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/sideprairie.jpg

    Our prairie plots seen from a distance in early summer seem a dull green and look like an overgrown lawn, rising only about knee deep. However, visit them in August through frost time and you'll find a riot of color extending well over your head.
    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/burnstart.jpg

    Yes, we DO burn off our prairie plots and meadows each spring, just as the Native Americans used to. While it may not look nice until a rain or two, it does help replenish nourishment in the soil and helps control woody invasive plants from taking over the prairie and choking it out. Here our burn master starts a burn by lighting the prairie upwind in different spots.
    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/girlburn.jpg

    Assistants, armed with only a rake, keep the fire spreading along the edges so that it burns completely across the plots.
    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/burnresult.jpg

    Voila! The result is a neatly burned prairie surfae, but deep within the soil the roots are ready to spring forth at the first rain and replenish the land.
    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/tallbonset.jpg


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/bluebirdmilkweed.jpg

    A blue bird house looks out over a stand of milkweed blossoms.These plants will attract the monarch butterflies who lay their eggs which eventually become fall's harbingers of winter - woolybear caterpillers! (Not to worry - bluebirds don't eat monarchs or the untasty woolybears.)
    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/emergingmonarchblack.jpg

    Monarch butterflies are drawn to the different milkweeds found in our prairies. They lay their eggs on the undersides of the leaves, and when hatched, the larvae feed upon the leaves until they become pupae and hatch out to another generation of butterflies.


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/monarch on milkweed black.jpg

    Once the struggle is over and it dries off, a beautiful monarch suns itself.


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/purplesomething.jpg


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/blackeyedsusans.jpg


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/orchidlikeflowers.jpg


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/whitedaisies.jpg


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/clovertypeflowers.jpg


    read more

  • James H. McBride Arboretum

    images/prairies/summer flower arb pics 6 29 11028.jpg


    read more