• James H. McBride Arboretum

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    Summer sunrise struggles over a meadowland.
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  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    The eary morning sun struggles to clear a field of wild rye.


  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    A profusion of wildflowers fills the meadows in mid to late summer months.

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  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    Early morning dew bedecks the autumn grasses.
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  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    Alchemellia mollis turns its head heavenward to reflect late summer's golden rays.

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  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    We burn our meadows each spring that the weather allows us to do so, imitating what the Native Americans used to do. Burning promotes fertilization of the land, retards growth of invasives, and can actually increase seed germination - some plant seeds need the heat of fire to break their dormancy.
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  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    This really looks bad, with only the pathways surviving the burn. But the meadows thrive and regenerate within mere weeks.


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  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    We burn off just a few acres of meadow each spring. Imagine what the area looked like when the Native Americans set fire to the prairies in this area! Look carefully and see the wody plants still sticking up. With luck, they will be charred enough so that they don't continue growing.
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  • James H. McBride Arboretum

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    With the fires over, one can see what happens when a year or two of burning does NOT take place - woody invasive plants can tend to take over, surviving the fires and eventually taking over the area, thus smothinging out the grasses and wildflowers.
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